Monthly Archives: September 2016

Police officers sue Bills RB LeSean McCoy over bar fight

Two off-duty Philadelphia police officers injured in a February bar fight involving Buffalo Bills running back LeSean McCoy filed a lawsuit Tuesday morning against the former NFL rushing leader in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas.

The civil lawsuit marks the latest step in a legal battle that had previously gone all the way to the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s office but had failed to result in any criminal charges against McCoy or anyone else.

“Our investigation has confirmed that [officers] Darnell Jessie and Roland Butler were viciously attacked and beaten by LeSean McCoy and the additional defendants. As a result of the violent assault, both men have suffered serious and permanent injuries,” said Fortunato N. Perri Jr., the attorney for the police officers involved in the fight.

McCoy’s attorney, Dennis Cogan, was not available Tuesday morning when contacted for a comment.

The lawsuit, obtained by Outside the Lines, names McCoy and three other members of his party: Curtis Brinkley, Tamarcus Porter and Christopher Henderson, all of whom were inside the Recess Lounge, a Philadelphia after-hours club, on Feb. 7.

The Recess Lounge also is named as a defendant. Officers Jessie and Butler allege the club was negligent in failing to provide adequate security and for continuing to serve alcohol to McCoy, Brinkley, Porter and Henderson, “who were already visibly intoxicated.”

Cogan told ESPN in July that McCoy was only trying to break up a fight between the officers and his friends, who had started arguing over a $350 bottle of champagne.

“Frankly, McCoy did nothing wrong. He was put through hell for no reason,” Cogan said at the time.

Police also have said the fight broke out over a misunderstanding about who had purchased the bottle of champagne.

McCoy, 28, is in his second season with the Bills after playing six years with the Philadelphia Eagles.

Justin Forsett says he’s still Ravens’ starting RB after ‘trial separation’

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Baltimore Ravens running back Justin Forsett said he will start in Sunday’s opener against the Buffalo Bills after coming back from what he humorously described as a trial separation.

Forsett, the Ravens’ leading rusher the past two seasons, confirmed Wednesday that his brief release from the team was part of a roster maneuver and said he has returned to his spot with the first-team offense.

“I’ll be lining up there as the starter as of now,” Forsett said. “It’s my job to go out there and try to dominate and make it clear for them.”

“I tried not to follow it, just because it was everywhere for so long,” Palmer said on a conference call with Patriots reporters. “I go back and you follow what the rule book says and you go about your business and you work, and if they tell you not to do it and then you get busted, and what happens happens, then you suffer the consequences.

Palmer and the Cardinals host the Patriots on Sunday night in the season-opening game for both teams. Jimmy Garoppolo will start at quarterback for the Patriots, with Brady serving a four-game NFL suspension as part of Deflategate penalties.

When Palmer was asked on the conference call if it was his perception that rules were broken, he said, “I don’t know, to be honest. Supposedly the balls went somewhere when they weren’t supposed to go there. There was humidity, or not enough humidity, or altitude or whatever it was. I don’t know. I didn’t follow the story. As soon as it came on, I just turned it off because I was so sick of hearing about it.

“Whatever the league comes down upon, and whatever ruling they make is what they make. You don’t have much of a decision after that. You can fight it for a little bit, but after a while, you just have to abide by what they say.”

Mularkey said he’s pleased with Henry’s work.

The fragile relationship between police and African-Americans is in deep crisis, anecdotally and statistically, and when Kaepernick expressed his awakening by refusing to stand for the national anthem, he and any peers considering similarly expressing themselves learned how society will respond to their citizenship and dissent: by using a playbook of distortion and misdirection as old and predictable as the Packer sweep.